Nathan Perry

Lecturer
 

Fields

Early Modern England

Early Modern Europe

Colonial Latin America

Ottoman Empire

World History

Atlantic World

History of Science

Contact Information

  • Office: Bldg. 116, Rm. 115
  • Telephone: 805-756-6452
  • E-mail: naperry@calpoly.edu
     

Education

PhD, Early Modern England, University of California, Santa Barbara
MA, Early Modern Europe, University of California, Santa Barbara
BA, History & Philosophy, University of California, Davis

Courses Taught

  • Hist 111: Western Civilization: Reformation to the Present
  • Hist 222: World History, 1000-1800
  • Hist 223: World History, 1800-Present
  • Hist 350: The Scientific Revolution, 1500-1800

Research and Teaching Interests

My research and teaching interests lie in the intersection of politics, religion, and culture.  While my primary research and teaching field is in Tudor and Stuart England and Early Modern European history, I teach courses in world, regional, and scientific history.  The interdisciplinary nature of my research and interests strongly influences  my teaching; I tend to focus on political, religious, philosophical, and ideological concepts in order to better understand and help explain the past.  I am currently revising and expanding my dissertation, which examines the ways in which different factions manipulated the rituals and rhetoric of royal ceremonial occasions at the court of James I & VI of England toward their own political and ideological ends.

Publications

"Great Britain's Solomon' Remebered: The Politics of Mourning James I & VI," Northeastern Conference on British Studies, Saint Michael's College, October 2016

"How Death is Defeated: The Politics of Mourning Anne of Denmark," Pacific Coast Conference on British Studies, Huntington Library, April 2016

"Turning Fish to Gold: Performance, Ideology, and the Virginia Company in the Jacobean Court," Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association Annual Meeting, May 2015

Dissertation Title

"The Politics of Spectacle: Ideology and Ambition in Jacobean Court Ceremonies"

 

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